Army Chemical Review

SUMMER 2013

Army Chemical Review presents professional information about Chemical Corps functions related to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, smoke, flame, and civil support operations.

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especially since our role seems to be less appreciated. Hazmat and technical escort teams are modern developments, but we need to expand these concepts and develop a combat or tactical hazmat team that combines expertise and missions. Smaller elements with appropriate skills and equipment could provide CBRN assistance to a unit encountering a CBRN situation. The conversion of CBRN reconnaissance platoons to CBRN/security platoons (combat-ready CBRN units that have multipurpose capabilities and are prepared to operate in any hostile environment) should be seriously considered. The effcient use of CBRN and combat skills together would give any combat arms unit an important edge. Evolve or Dissolve At the time of this writing, the modifed table of organization and equipment for brigade special troops battalions had just been changed so that the security section was no longer included. However, the brigade special troops battalion need not be staffed with Military Occupational Specialty 11B and 74D Soldiers; instead, it could be staffed with a new breed of 74-series Soldiers. The fact that the Chemical Corps needs to be restructured in terms of units, purpose, and training cannot be overstated. We say that we rule the elements, but we are not adapting well to the modern Army—and this is especially true among combat arms units, where CBRN training is often devalued and deferred. Many hardworking CBRN offcers try to provide their battalions with some sort of training—only to be shunned by the battalion commander and bombarded with additional duties. However, the response to combined 1st Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, CBRN/combat missions has been positive. Perhaps this experience can serve as a source of inspiration for other CBRN units and young CBRN offcers. I'm not suggesting that the curriculum be tossed out, but an update is overdue. The formation of other CBRN/security platoons would be an excellent start. References: FM 3-11, Multi-Service Doctrine for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Operations, 1 July 2011. FM 3-11.19, Multi-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Reconnaissance, 30 July 2004. (Superseded by Army Techniques Publication [ATP] 3-11.37, Multi-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Reconnaissance and Surveillance, 25 March 2013.) FM 3-19.15, Civil Disturbance Operations, 18 April 2005. (Currently undergoing revision.) Winslow Tandler, "Leveraging the Chemical Corps," Army Chemical Review, Winter 2011, pp. 13–14. Albert J. Mauroni, Chemical-Biological Defense: U.S. Military Policies and Decisions in the Gulf War, Praeger, Westport, Connecticut, 1998. Editor's Note: FM 3-11, Multi-Service Doctrine for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Operations—the keystone multi-Service CBRN manual—has been updated twice during the past 10 years. The current (1 July 2011) edition represents a major revision from previous versions, focusing on the prevention and/or elimination of threats and hazards. FM 3-11 incorporates the eight combating WMD military mission areas into a tactical-level lexicon with validated lessons learned from ongoing counterinsurgency operations. In addition, Army Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures (ATTP) 3-11.36 (Multi-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Aspects of Command and Control, 12 July 2010) was created to address the unique employment and mission command of CBRN assets and ATTP 3-11.23 (Multi-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Weapons of Mass Destruction Elimination Operations, 10 December 2010) was established to fll the gap for the employment of general and technical CBRN forces that conduct WMD elimination operations. Furthermore, ATP 3-11.37 (Multi-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Reconnaissance and Surveillance) was updated (25 March 2013) to account for the NBCRV platform and hazard assessment and dismounted-reconnaissance capabilities. Further discussion is available on the Protection Warfghter Forum (WfF) Net at . Please visit the site and provide your input. Your contributions are valued. At the time this article was written, Captain Model was the brigade CBRN offcer, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. He has since left the Active Army to pursue a career in emergency management/law enforcement. He holds a bachelor's degree in information technology and criminal justice from Curry College, Milton, Massachusetts, and is working toward a master's degree in emergency management from American Military University. FM 3-11.21, Multi-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Consequence Management Operations, 1 April 2008. (Currently undergoing revision.) FM 3-11.34, Multi-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Installation CBRN Defense, 6 November 2007 (Superseded by ATP 3-11.42, Multi-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Intsallation Emergency Management, 26 April 2013.) Summer 2013 27

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